FIAT/IFTA Television Studies Commission announces:
The First FIAT/IFTA Television Studies Seminar
PARIS, May 14th 2010

This international Television Studies Seminar, hosted by the Institut National de l’Audiovisuel (INA) at their central Paris location will present academic papers based on research conducted in FIAT/IFTA member archives and illustrated by extracts provided by those archives.

Paper proposals should include a brief abstract and details of arrangements made with the television archive at which the research will be conducted.  Participating FIAT/IFTA member archives will provide research facilities and extracts on DVD free of charge.  Full details of requirements and participating archives are on the Television Studies Commission page of the FIAT/IFTA website.

Proposals should be sent to the appropriate member of the Television Studies Commission by December 31st 2009.  The Seminar languages will be English and French, with translation provided.
Proposals can cover any aspect of television history or practice, though the following topics are suggested:

  • The transition from black and white to colour
  • Cinema on television
  • Transnational comparisons of genres or styles (which could use the resource of Video Active)
  • Aspects of studying complete days of output, especially comparative studies of those recorded on October 27th 2008 and 2009 by certain FIAT member archives (details on the website)

One of the papers delivered at the Seminar will be chosen for presentation at the FIAT/IFTA Conference in Dublin in October 2010, with its author receiving free registration and full travel and accommodation expenses.

By Jaap Blom

1574The article Accepting Exceptions – in issue #81 of the magazine DOX – shows the efforts of the EU to alleviate the strict copyright laws for documentary filmmakers by having issued a Green Paper on common legislation for the free movement of knowledge within the European market. The paper is modelled after the Documentary Filmmakers’ Statement of Best Practices in Fair Use, which has been used in the US since 2005 and has been a great help for filmmakers. In the article Video Active and the European Film Gateway are mentioned as being good coalition partners backing up the goals mentioned in EU’s Green Paper; hopefully to become a White Paper in the near future.

efg_logoDiscussion of the article  “European Film Gateway: A Portal for Film Archives” on Ariadne by Sander Peek

The European Film Gateway (EFG) will enhance the use of the online-archive resources of European cinema. The portal will be linked with the server of the online library Europeana, which started in November 2008. As part of the eContentplus Programme, the European Commission aims to develop Europeana further by adding the cinematic archive. The EFG project started in September 2008. It will contain 700,000 digitised objects from a variety of film archives and cinematic institutions by the end of the project and is still under construction.
The EFG project resembles other projects of the EU commission to preserve footage of cultural importance. Video Active works in a similar fashion. The videos on VideoActive will be part of Europeana just like the films from the EFG project.
By combining the European Film Gateway portal with Europeana, the EU Commission hopes to attract a much wider audience to the service. By 2010, the library that contains European heritage such as paintings and literature, should hold over 10 million digital resources and items. At the moment Europeana contains around two million items.

 

 

 

A large number of the Video Active consortium attended the Television Without Borders international conference held at the University of Reading in the UK (27-29 June 2008) to present papers on television history, archival practices and on the Video Active project itself. 

The conference focused on the way in which television crosses borders, in the past, present and future, and examined the role of the medium in promoting or challenging forms of national and cultural identity. The three-day event was attended by over 100 international delegates from Europe, the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and China, and discussion explored the way that television  programmes, genres, personnel, technologies, policies and economics  have all been implicated at an international level in forms cultural exchange, appropriation and resistance.

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